The Kitschies

The prize for progressive, intelligent & entertaining fiction that contains elements of the speculative or fantastic -- www.thekitschies.com

effyeahnationalbookfestival:

Patrick Ness’ awesome feminist rant in response to a reader question.

effyeahnationalbookfestival:

Patrick Ness’ awesome feminist rant in response to a reader question.

John Connolly & Ben Aaronovitch

Thursday, April 17

6.30 pm

Blackwell’s Charing Cross

RSVP

theparisreview:

“Goddamn it, FEELING is what I like in art, not CRAFTINESS and the hiding of feelings.” —Jack Kerouac, born on this day in 1922.

theparisreview:

“Goddamn it, FEELING is what I like in art, not CRAFTINESS and the hiding of feelings.” —Jack Kerouac, born on this day in 1922.

theparisreview:

Talking doors, gossip machines, super-duper turntables: here’s what Philip K. Dick, writing from the vantage point of 1966, thought 1992 might have been like. Would that it were.
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Talking doors, gossip machines, super-duper turntables: here’s what Philip K. Dick, writing from the vantage point of 1966, thought 1992 might have been like. Would that it were.

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Nick Harkaway - 234

harkaway:

* So what’s it like judging the Kitschies?

It’s like having your brain inflated as a balloon and then made into a model of a puppy and then squeezed through a letterbox between copies of “The Wealth and Poverty of Nations” and “The Hobbit”.

likegyldig asked: do you have any writing tips?

harkaway:

1. Write. Not just what you know but what you are. You don’t know the life of a Novosibirsk shoe-fetishist hitman, but that doesn’t mean you couldn’t write it if you gave him your own heart.

2. Keep writing. You’ll have to go back and rework from time to time - in fact, it’ll give you more momentum as things fall into line - but if you rewrite chapter one thirty times it’s still chapter one. The same amount of writing in a straight line gets you a finished draft.

3. Write unrestrainedly. Narrative discipline can be imposed; excitement is much harder to add to a lumpen structure. Use the shapes and words you want. Be profligate, then cut. Don’t let anyone tell you to avoid Latinisms, adverbs, or semi-colons. They exist. They belong to you. If you don’t like them, cut them, but they are no one else’s to forbid.

4. Write now. Don’t wait. You can get useful work done in a ten minute window. Five. Three. On the other hand, learn to bank the urgency, let it out when you can. Life will not always afford you five minutes, and that too is part of the gig. Part of your job is to be in the world. Someone who can’t ditch their desk for half an hour to hug a friend who’s had a bad breakup may or may not be a good writer, but they’re definitely an asshole. Contrary to what you may have heard, that’s not a requirement.

5. Write again. Write, cut, rework, reshape, up-end, restructure. A storyteller can begin the narrative anywhere and make it grip. Now again, and again until you feel wrung out. And again until it stops getting better. It’s never finished, you just come to the end if yourself - or your publisher’s schedule. It’s a stamina game.

6. Let it go. Show it. Accept exposure, admiration, misunderstanding, praise and contempt. Accept also that the book everyone is talking about, enthusiastically or not, is not the book you care about, because you’ve been in love with the new one since somewhere in the middle of stage 5.

7. Repeat. Learn. Improve.

I think of what story I can tell that hasn’t been told before or told in my way before. What questions can I ask? How can I show a new world, a new future, and new possibilities to a young reader?

Because they’re listening. Don’t ever think they’re not.

—   Patrick Ness’ speech to open the Imagine Festival (2014)

(Source: patrickness.com)

“…here’s the truth: luxury always comes at someone else’s expense. One of the many advantages of civilization is that one doesn’t generally have to see that, if one doesn’t wish. You’re free to enjoy its benefits without troubling your conscience.”

—   from Ancillary Justice, by Ann Leckie (via kammartinez)